Journey

I am about to make a major decision in my life: I want to be nomadic. After so much thought, I realize how much I am missing in my life after reaching and struggling, testing and deciding, competing and asserting. It is a cliché  to say that  “Life is a journey.” But most of the time we are focused on our destination and not on the journey itself. The process is as important as the results. We are so preoccupied with the future and most of what we do are based on perceived consequences. We study to work. We work to save money. We practice to be perfect. We learn a set of skills to get a better job, and to be a better person. Can we just learn simply because we want it? We live for the future and much worse, you hear some people linger on the past. Why are we like this when the most important moment in our lives is the present? I got inspiration from a TEDx talks of Colin Wright, Extreme Lifestyle Experiments and Eoin Finn, Hammock Enlightenment. They have a different perspective on what a quality life is.

How does being nomadic relate with all my nonsensical and impractical ideas?

I want to be nomadic because….

I want to meet “real” people.

Our society is highly industrialized that we have become machines too. We are extensions of computers, power plants, cellphones and cars when it should be the other way around. We are programmed with a set of tasks and goals. Sometimes when you ride a train or walk towards work, you see people like paintings not as human being, capable of sending and receiving stimuli. On the other hand, when you travel and meet people who are on vacation, you see them as themselves.  Real people are not machines, not slaves, and not just members of the population.  They love family and friends. They are passionate in what they do. They get scared.  They get tired. They share the same feelings with you.  You may feel bad over the news on TV but not everybody can understand your sentiments.  On the other hand, traveling makes as one. We can all share the fear of heights, the excitement of a new place.

sagada family

new friends – the family we met during our trip to Sagada
sagada tourguide

Our Tour Guide during trekking … She taught us a new word “Ibayaw,” an expression to show concern
sagada mangcesar

Mang Cesar, the owner of Happy House. He cooks and serves his guestssagada clement

Our tour guide in Echo Valley… he looks nice, divah? pwede? hehe

I want to experience.

Everything counts as an experience but the thing about having conquest behavior (the busy mode mentality in a fast-paced environment), we don’t do things for experience sake. On a regular day, before trying something new, we always ask, “How will this benefit me?” Will I be rich? Will I be pretty? How we think is influenced by trade and commerce. And again, it all boils down to practical value. When you’re a tourist in a town, it changes how you see things. Your mind is set that this might be the first time in forever or the last time. I just wonder how Makati or big cities would look like if everybody acted like a tourist. Probably, there will be a few hot-tempered people, and probably an increase of friendly people.

sagada climbing

I want to be a minimalist

I travel light. As much as possible, I only bring one backpack. When you travel, you try to keep only those that are essential. You don’t bring all your clothes, gadgets. And sometimes it helps when you have no internet access. There you can appreciate life, bare and uncluttered.

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I want to be connected with the universe.

The world will be a happier place if everybody take their time to appreciate what they see, what you taste, and what they hear. These are moments that make us alive: when you take notice of the birds, when you hear the shore chasing your toes, when your skin gets hurt with the warmth of the sun, when you let the wind lift you up, when you don’t think too much, when you are in awe over small things.

 sagada echo valley

sagada terraces

sagada mountain

After reading this, question:

do you think im odd

The world is too big and life is too short 🙂

Alternative Pastime for Your Ears

Are you tired of listening to the same playlist in your media player? Watched the same music videos in Youtube? If music starts to be deafening, you can have this as an alternative pastime for your ears.

In my quiet moments, I browse videos of TEDx. For those of you who don’t know, “TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x=independently organized TED event. ” It carries a tagline  ” ideas worth sharing.”

I enjoy listening to speeches that are well crafted.  After all,  I finished a degree in Speech Communication. But I must admit that I have short attention span. Sometimes, I end up daydreaming after listening the first five minutes of   a lecture, a sermon, and a group discussion.  Well, listening to TEDx speeches is different. They are easy on the ears, that you forget you spent nine minutes listening. You can do it while working and browsing in the internet. Here are some of my favorites.

Craig Walzer – Artful Lies and Shelves of Fiction

On one vacation in Santorin, Greece, two American boys  looked for a bookshop but could not find one. This sprout the idea of building a bookshop.  After Craig graduated, he went back to Greece and  built a bookshop where people can read, tell stories, and make bonfires in the evening.

Cameron Russell –  Image is powerful

I admired this woman for being brutally honest about the modeling industry.  Her talk in TEDx has become viral and controversial. There are a lot of negative comments but I bet they don’t get her point. She does not sugarcoat, like showbiz people do.  She said: ” The real way that I became a model is that I won a genetic lottery, and I am the recipient of a legacy. What do I mean by legacy? Well, for the past few centuries we have defined beauty not just as health and youth and symmetry that we’re biologically programmed to admire, but also as tall, slender figures, and femininity and white skin. And this is a legacy that was built for me, and it’s a legacy that I’ve been cashing in on.”

Jarrett J. Krosoczka – How a boy became an artist

He is an illustrator and writer of children’s books. He has sense of humor and overflowing passion. This video brings me smiles.

Sabsy Ongkiko: Our Return of Investment

In the Philippines, my favorite TED talk is a speech of a public school teacher. She graduated in one of top universities in the Philippines. In spite of having outstanding credentials, she preferred to work as a  public school teacher. She is very inspiring. I was in tears while listening to her speech.  I know there are a lot of young leaders who want to make a difference  in the country but she is different from the rest.   Some do good and some fight for a cause because in return they will get merit and credit for what they do. On the other hand, this woman is  a genuine modern day hero. You can tell through her speech that she gives her service not for self-fulfillment sake.

Sarah Kay: If I should have a daughter

Sarah Kay is a spoken word poet. She is a captivating speaker. I recommend not only her TEDx video but all her videos. You will cling to every word she says.

“It’s not that I think that spoken word poetry is the ideal art form. I’m always trying to find the best way to tell each story. I write musicals; I make short films alongside my poems. But I teach spoken word poetry because it’s accessible. Not everyone can read music or owns a camera, but everyone can communicate in some way, and everyone has stories that the rest of us can learn from. Plus, spoken word poetry allows for immediate connections. It’s not uncommon for people to feel like they’re alone or that nobody understands them, but spoken word teaches that if you have the ability to express yourself and the courage to present those stories and opinions, you could be rewarded with a room full of your peers, or your community, who will listen. “

I hope you get to watch these videos. I’m sure you’ll find far more interesting videos from TEDx. It’s a treasure box of ideas.