Long Captions

They say when you write a message make it “short but sweet” but sometimes  the longer  the better,  the sweeter.

Writing long captions can be relieving

If  I have to use one word to describe my 2015, it’s “cheesy”

Here are my cheesy, hugot-filled, and longest captions in instagram 😀

On this caption, I just want to justify why I have to post a photo of tulips when all I have to say, “Thank you very much for the flowers. I really really like them”  😀

Complaining and “hugoting” are quite similar feelings. It is not very unlikely  to compare MRT with love life.

I wrote this with my heart singing…. char! 😀

View this post on Instagram

When I browse through the narratives of my life: blog entries, old diaries, random posts online, I realize I enjoy writing about pain , dramatic moments or simply called “kaechosan” or “kaartehan”.. But I can't write happiness in full details. My theory is that pain demands to be released while happiness demands to be locked, to be sealed and if you can store it for a long time, you will. But if you can vomit pain through words, you will…. For how can you write happy thoughts? Every time I put into words, I get stuck on that memory that I cannot continue
Moments like when you cannot speak as you catch your breath after a long hike
and all you can think of is the vast landscape in front of you or when you are caught by surprise and the only sounds coming from you are “woooooh” wow”
they do not even constitute a meaning Moments that could have been elaborated with fancy quotes
but hormones, heartbeats block your vocabulary
and of all the words you can pick in the dictionary
You just say, “happy and beautiful”
to describe your feelings The things that we cannot express are the ones that are most profound. In summary, thank you! You are the kind of happiness that I have never written before… You are the kind of happiness that I cannot articulate #chos #travel #travelph

A post shared by jackiebelo.com 👗👓🦄🌈 (@jackiebelo) on

Inner Selfie and Imaginary Audience

fb userDo you have friends in Facebook who regularly post photos of themselves? Does it starve you staring at Instagram photos of your friends’ meals? Do you want to hide someone in your wall  because s/he occupies your news feed? Do you like to believe that you don’t care about the new car, new shoes of your friends  posted in Facebook? Do you wonder why this person has to broadcast every detail of his day including the place he checked-in with Google map attached? At times, these people can be very annoying. But wait, you can be one of the self-centered, self-absorbed, self-conscious people. As I believe, each of us has an inner selfie waiting to be unleashed.

Everybody is using social media for self-promotion. If you like to sell a product or service, make a Facebook page. If you have an idea, share it. If you have a show, promote. If you have a talk, invite. If you support a cause, inform. Sometimes, it’s funny when we talk about ourselves as third person. If you are a performer, you might tweet: “I am going to perform this Valentine’s Day, catch me in Music Museum.” If you are a motivational speaker, you might tweet: “I’ll be having a talk on How to Improve Your Life. See you in Cebu.” Even FB wall status encourages you to use third-person voice. Jackie Bello is listening to Mozart. Jackie Bello is feeling loved. We become our own publicists.

Whether you share news articles or state a political opinion, it is your inner selfie who wants to be relevant. Even if you use alias or pen name in your blog, you are still making yourself important.  You believe your thoughts, your life events, are worth publishing online. Whether you rant and write your depression in life, you are aiming at an audience whom you assume will understand you. And this imaginary audience that you subconsciously think of before you upload and update, includes your peers, high school classmates, new-found friends, acquaintances, the guy you met online, the ex of your ex, your future mother-in-law, the people you admire, the last person you just gave your business card, the people you envy, the  people you hate, and others. Imagine a big cyber crowd is waiting for an update of your life. This is what your inner selfie has been whispering to your head. In real life, we don’t like stalkers but when we are online, we like stalkers. We build a fantasy that we are celebrities. And I plead guilty.

Hence, I appeal to the general public: do not judge the selfies. Do not complain about  their prominent presence online. Do not complain about the number of photos they have, wearing the same outfit, same hairstyle, same lightning. Yes, they are in love with themselves but I prefer them over people who type negative comments in Youtube, who backbite online using blind items in their wall status, who share disappointment and anger over traffic, weather, and over anything else. We just need some positive people around. Besides, we have a fair share of narcissistic moments online. You and I are guilty.

I initially want to conclude this by saying: “Choose what you share online. Evaluate if it’s worth sharing. Sharing is good.” But in the internet world, sharing is not very different from bragging. What do you give when you share a selfie photo? Will it brighten someone’s day?  Or will you make a bad impression by showing how idle you are? What will people get when you share a photo of yourself?

Entertainment, I guess.

We live in our imagination.

Here are a few lines from Vanesa Hidary, in her piece, Forever Beautiful till I Saw You on Facebook.

You see there is  an amazing place in my brain called my imagination. And even though it might have me delusional and have me think that my recent love is home miserable by my absence. I’d like to live in that place… It’s so ridiculous I know to not know things when you actually can. But  like the busy signal sometimes I just like to be unavailable to be reached.

This will not end without a selfie photo.

sample selfie

Follow Jackie Belo on WordPress.com
%d bloggers like this: